Introduction to Buddhism

Reading from chapter 1 of the Kagyu school's introductory text to Buddhism:

'I' wants the world to know 'me' but it is all parroting, the machine is being operated from behind, because there is no alertness, no sense of being present or really alive. Our life is governed, dictated by our habits of confusion, obscuration, and distraction.

In order to change this situation, Buddhism introduces the skillful means of meditation practice. We must begin to learn to sit with ourselves and feel more comfortable with who we are. Meditation practice does not mean that we have something to meditate upon, or that something new or totally different is going to happen in our lives. Meditation simply means cultivating a wholesome and sane habit, which becomes an antidote for the unwholesome, confused, destructive habits that we have developed. Meditation practice enables us to experience our own thinking and knowing. Meditation is mindfulness, and in order to experience this we must repeatedly apply the methods, because any habit, wholesome or unwholesome, is developed by repetition.

I wish I could carry this around with me.

On the easy marriage between computer games and spirituality

While dabbling in Eastern Spirituality I've encountered this idea of "Transcendental Truth". That is; Truth which is imparted using a particular form (eg speech, sound, words etc) but is not bound by that form. The form literally describes the outline of the Truth that is being communicated but is not itself the thing being described. Once grasped, the form can then be left behind.

I (imperfectly) recall a Sutra in which one of the Buddha's disciples asked him a question about form. In the answer the Buddha likens his teaching to a canoe and the disciple needing the canoe in order to cross a river. Once the river is crossed, the canoe can be safely left behind. No need to carry a canoe into the desert where it will only be a hindrance.

Anyway - All of this only to say that the Transcendental Truth is described by the form you encounter it in, without being contained by it.